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Beware Of Drinking Too Much Sports Drinks. They Can Cause Tooth Erosion

Sports drinks have become so popular nowadays that they are starting to replace sodas as a recreational beverage, especially among teenagers, college students, young professionals, and, of course, those who are very much into sports like athletes and weekend warriors. Sports drinks like Gatorade and Red Bull, just to name a few, give us those energy boosters that we need to jolt our senses so that we’d feel more alive. But drinking too much of those sports drinks can actually damage our teeth, according to a dentist in Santa Clarita.

The dentist, who practices dentistry at the Dental Santa Clarita oral care center and has followed the effects of drinking too many sports drinks on the oral health of patients, said that sipping sports drinks all day, which has become a popular practice, especially among active individuals or those whose energy levels are quite high, exposes people to a high level of acids that can make our teeth feel sensitive and at the same time cause tooth erosion. He said he has had patients who consume a huge volume of sports drinks because they have to and thought there was nothing wrong with it. “Sports drinks are fine as long we don’t consume too much of it. The substances that are found in sports drink can wreck havoc on our teeth in the long run, even if we get a dose of energy boosters from sports drinks like Gatorade,” the dentist said.

Dentists in Santa Clarita pointed out that a study that was conducted by dental researchers from New York University has found that a prolonged consumption of sports drinks may be linked to a condition known as erosive tooth wear, wherein acids seep through the tooth’s smooth hard enamel and eat away its coating. Then, this trickles into the bonelike material underneath and causes the tooth to soften and weaken. This condition, according to the study, affects one in 15 Americans and can result in severe tooth damage and even tooth loss if left untreated.

A dentist in Simi Valley, who practices dentistry at Dental Simi Valley and has treated patients whose teeth have eroded due largely to frequent consumptions of sports drinks, said that what makes matters worse is that some of those who drink sports drinks immediately brush their teeth. “This compounds and complicates the problem of tooth erosion. The softened enamel is very susceptible to the abrasive properties of toothpaste,” the dentist said. He added that sports drinks should be consumed in moderation, and that patients should wait at least 30 minutes before they brush their teeth if they want to prevent tooth erosion. This would give the softened enamel more time to re-harden itself. He also pointed out that for those think that they have consumed too much sports drinks and had their teeth damaged, they should ask their dentists if it would advisable for them to use an acid neutralizing re-mineralizing toothpaste instead to help re-harden soft enamel.

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